Charles Beltrami

NAME
Charles Beltrami
NICKNAME
SERVICE NUMBER
294339
UNIT
Company K
Third Battalion
5th Marines
HOME OF RECORD
RD #2, Stoystown, PA
NEXT OF KIN
Mother, Mrs. Savilla Beltrami
DATE OF BIRTH
November 27, 1921
ENTERED SERVICE
September 6, 1940
DATE OF LOSS
November 2, 1942
REGION
Solomon Islands
CAMPAIGN / AREA
Guadalcanal
CASUALTY TYPE
Killed in Action
CIRCUMSTANCES OF LOSS

Corporal Charles Beltrami served with K/3/5th Marines during the battle of Guadalcanal.

On 2 November 1942, the 5th Marines continued the Matanikau Offensive by enveloping a strongpoint at the base of Point Cruz, Guadalcanal. Third Battalion, 5th encountered a stubborn group of Japanese firing from a trench, supported by artillery. Hand-to-hand combat – including, unusually, bayonet charges by the Marines – broke through the main defensive points in the Japanese line.

Beltrami was hit and killed by a shell fragment during one of the assaults. His body was not recovered from the field; his burial location – and whether he received a burial at all – is not known.

INDIVIDUAL DECORATIONS
Purple Heart
LAST KNOWN RANK
Corporal
STATUS OF REMAINS
Not recovered
MEMORIALS
Manila American Cemetery

Biography:
Coming soon. Contact the webmaster for information on this Marine.

War is a game of objectives. 01 was taken. Stand by for orders. 02 was designated, a ravine some 200 yards distant. Take 02 and rest. So in the direction of 02 we went. The temperature was around 110 degrees. 02 was hard come by. We lost some men, including Beltrami, 18 years old and had never shaved. 02 was taken. Costly, but taken. Stand by for orders. Take 03 and you‘re relieved. 03 was just an imaginary line on the map and was taken, again with many wounded in our company.

We took this objective but were pinned down and couldn‘t move just yet. The high command gave us a burst of artillery fire, which helped. Now the high command poured salt into our wounds. “You have to take 04.” Hell, man, we already took more than our allotment! It was here we found that war didn’t come in allotments. You took what you could, held what you had, and took more if the job demanded it.

– T. I. Miller, K/3/5, “War And Work.”


Articles and Records:


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