Owen W. Craddock

NAME
Owen Webb Craddock
NICKNAME
SERVICE NUMBER
339312
UNIT
Company C
First Battalion
5th Marines
HOME OF RECORD
Montgomery, MI
NEXT OF KIN
Father, Mr. Albert H. Craddock
DATE OF BIRTH
1922
ENTERED SERVICE
January 2, 1942
DATE OF LOSS
November 1, 1942
REGION
Solomon Islands
CAMPAIGN / AREA
Guadalcanal
CASUALTY TYPE
Killed In Action
CIRCUMSTANCES OF LOSS
PFC Owen W. Craddock served with C/1/5th Marines during the battle of Guadalcanal.

On 1 November 1942, 1/5th Marines crossed the Matanikau River and attacked Japanese positions in the vicinity of Point Cruz. Company C ran into a strongpoint in a ravine and was stopped cold, and repeated attempts only drove up the casualty rate. By nightfall, 27 Marines of C/1/5 were dead or mortally wounded – one of the highest fatality rates any Marine company suffered in a single action on Guadalcanal. PFC Craddock was among those killed at the strongpoint.

The following day, thirty Marines from 1/5 were buried in the field at a site 400 yards west of Point Cruz and 600 yards from the beach. Only seven were recovered after the battle; the remainder, including PFC Craddock, were classed as non-recoverable.

INDIVIDUAL DECORATIONS
Purple Heart
LAST KNOWN RANK
Private First Class
STATUS OF REMAINS
Buried in the field.
“about 400 yards West of Point Cruz,
about 600 yards inland from the sea.”
MEMORIALS
Camden Cemetery, Camden, MI
Manila American Cemetery

Biography:
Coming soon. Contact the webmaster for more information about this Marine.

“Saw Ausili die. Louis Kovacs was dead but still warm, Harland Swart, Carlson, Potocki, Doucette, Waterstraw… everyone was dead… shot to hell and back. It was the saddest and most awful sight I’ve ever seen in my life. I saw Jack Holland, leader 2nd Platoon, shot in the shoulder. Henry Loughman was shot in the groin and died… I found Crosby’s body… Poor fellow, he never knew what hit him.”

– Lieutenant Maurice Raphael, B/1/5, diary entry. Congressional Record: Proceedings and Debates of the 124th Congress, October 14 1978.

Articles & Records:


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