Harold G. Dick

NAME
Harold Gustave Dick
NICKNAME
MCSN
360129
HOME OF RECORD
1671 Vyse Avenue, Bronx, NY
NEXT OF KIN
Mother, Mrs. Rose Snedcof
DATE OF BIRTH
1924
DATE OF ENLISTMENT
January 27, 1942
DATE OF LOSS
September 27, 1942
REGION
Solomons
CAMPAIGN / AREA
Guadalcanal / Second Matanikau
CASUALTY TYPE
Killed In Action
UNIT
D/1/7th Marines
DUTY
MG Ammo Carrier
CIRCUMSTANCES OF LOSS
On 27 September 1942, a detachment of the First Battalion, 7th Marines under the command of Major Otho Rogers made an amphibious landing at Point Cruz, behind Japanese defensive positions along Guadalcanal’s Matanikau River. Surrounded by fast moving enemy troops, they established a defensive perimeter around the summit of Hill 84 and suffered heavy casualties before fighting their way back to the beach. The survivors were rescued by landing craft; the battle was derisively nicknamed “Little Dunkirk.”

Private Dick was killed in action while attempting to deploy his machine gun near the base of Hill 84. His remains were not recovered from the battlefield.

INDIVIDUAL DECORATIONS
Bronze Star, Purple Heart
LAST KNOWN RANK
Private
STATUS OF REMAINS
“Not recovered due to battle conditions.”
MEMORIALS
Manila American Cemetery

Biography:
Temporarily removed for editing and updating. Contact the webmaster for information on this Marine.

After we had gotten in about twenty-five or thirty yards, this kid next to me looked at our platoon sergeant Bucky Stowers and said, “I think the Raiders are in back of us.” Then the Japs came in; we had no idea they were coming in behind us to attack. All of a sudden my squad was down at the bottom of the hill while the rest of the guys had made it to the top to dig in. I head gunfire and Stowers [had his gun] shot right out of his hand. He was right there, a couple feet from me, when it happened…. The next thing I knew, this kid next to me, the number four kid, was shot in the head. His name was Dick; he was a Jewish kid from New York. I could have touched him; he was that close to me when he got shot. It’s amazing when you think of the way things go; it could have just as easily been me that got hit.
The number one and two men were both shot: one was [Elmer] Anderson and the other [Vincent] Aidigi. The corporal in charge, [Giles]… had his head blown off. Somebody said he got hit with an exploding shell…. And then the other kid was shot; he was from Ohio, Steubenville. He got shot maybe two or three times. The guys in my squad all got shot so quickly; we didn’t even have the guns set up or anything…. I was the only one left.
Private Ed Poppendick, D/1/7, quoted inĀ War Stories of the Infantry by Michael Green & James D. Brown

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