Anthony P. Malanowski

NAME
Anthony Peter Malanowski
NICKNAME
Andy
MCSN
238894
HOME OF RECORD
1307 Calvert Street, Baltimore, MD
NEXT OF KIN
Mother, Mrs. Rozalia Malanowski
DATE OF BIRTH
January 31, 1915
DATE OF ENLISTMENT
July 25, 1933
DATE OF LOSS
September 27, 1942
REGION
Solomons
CAMPAIGN / AREA
Guadalcanal / Second Matanikau
CASUALTY TYPE
Killed In Action
UNIT
A/1/7th Marines
DUTY
CIRCUMSTANCES OF LOSS
On 27 September 1942, a detachment of the First Battalion, 7th Marines under the command of Major Otho Rogers made an amphibious landing at Point Cruz, behind Japanese defensive positions along Guadalcanal’s Matanikau River. Surrounded by fast moving enemy troops, they established a defensive perimeter around the summit of Hill 84 and suffered heavy casualties before fighting their way back to the beach. The survivors were rescued by landing craft; the battle was derisively nicknamed “Little Dunkirk.”

As his company raced back to safety, Platoon Sergeant Malanowski picked up a discarded BAR and took up a position behind a fallen tree, providing covering fire until he was himself killed. His remains were never recovered from the battlefield.

INDIVIDUAL DECORATIONS
Navy Cross, Purple Heart, Good Conduct Medal
LAST KNOWN RANK
Platoon Sergeant
STATUS OF REMAINS
“Not recovered due to battle conditions.”
MEMORIALS
Holy Rosary Cemetery, Dundalk, MD
Manila American Cemetery

Biography:
Temporarily removed for editing and updating. Contact the webmaster for information on this Marine.

I can honestly say that my platoon sergeant was the finest man’s Marine I ever met during my four years in the Corps. I never heard him swear; he did not smoke or chew. He had one close friend, the company’s 1st Sgt. [Joe B.] Ford. They had both served together in China. Sarge was always neat in appearance, setting a fine example for us all. The best I can recall is that he was 180 pounds, 5’8’’, barrel-chested with very strong arms and legs, and without any facial hair on his round face, and none on his head. He always wore a cap or helmet. His carriage was that of a military man.  He was not inclined to talk unless there was a need to. While I am not sure, I think he went to Mass when available.
PFC Leland DeRocher, A/1/7
One of my worst enemies, yet one of the best soldiers I ever knew, was a guy by the name of Anthony P. Malanowski. He was my platoon sergeant. For one reason or another which I don’t wanna get into, he and I didn’t like each other… so I got all the good details like digging the trenches, mess duty, and everything bad he could give me. But I would follow him into hell because he was a good soldier. I figured I’d have a better chance of living. He was a hero. He came down to the beach and he had a BAR… he was shooting that, fighting the Japanese, and he got hit in the chest, near the heart I guess, and before he fell down he gave the BAR to somebody else.
Private Charles M. Jacobs, A/1/7
I was the last marine to see [Malanowski] at Point Cruz. He was slumped across a log. I rolled him over, took what was left of his ammo, and ran for it.
Corporal Donald Dillard, D/1/7

Articles and Records:

Excerpt from the muster roll of A/1/7, September 1942.

Articles by Jamie Malanaowski (via jamiemalanowski.com)
“Our Family’s Hero: Andy Malanowski, USMC”
“More On Andy Malanowski”

Photo Gallery:

Photos found on jamiemalanowski.com

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