Daniel D. Sweeney

NAME
Daniel Dermott Sweeney
NICKNAME
MCSN
282942
HOME OF RECORD
102 West 92nd Street, New York, NY
NEXT OF KIN
Mother, Mrs. Della Sweeney
DATE OF BIRTH
March 23, 1920
DATE OF ENLISTMENT
September 20, 1940
DATE OF LOSS
November 2, 1942
REGION
Solomons
CAMPAIGN / AREA
Guadalcanal / Matanikau Offensive
CASUALTY TYPE
MIA / Declared Dead
November 4, 1943
UNIT
K/3/5th Marines
DUTY
CIRCUMSTANCES OF LOSS

The 5th Marines continued their part of the Matanikau Offensive by enveloping a strongpoint at the base of Point Cruz, Guadalcanal. Third Battalion, 5th encountered a stubborn group of Japanese firing from a trench, supported by artillery. Hand-to-hand combat – including, unusually, bayonet charges by the Marines – broke through the main defensive points in the Japanese line.

Corporal Daniel Sweeney of K/3/5 was with his company at 1645 hours, just before the spontaneous bayonet charge. He disappeared in the melee that followed, and although American forces occupied the area, he was never seen alive again. Although a patrol from his company later discovered a grave marked “Sweeney” and recognized the man buried there, the corporal’s ultimate fate is unknown. He was declared dead on 4 November 1943.

INDIVIDUAL DECORATIONS
Purple Heart
LAST KNOWN RANK
Corporal
STATUS OF REMAINS
Missing in action.
Possibly found buried in the field by friendly patrol, not recovered.
MEMORIALS
Manila American Cemetery

Biography:
Coming soon. Contact the webmaster for information on this Marine.

Every day there were patrols. One patrol was directed to seek out and identify the remains of one member of an earlier patrol. They found his grave and upon digging out the remains found that the jungle had already begun to claim the body. They recognized a tattoo on the forearm of the man, but since there were no dog tags on him they simply had to list him as missing in action. The strange thing was, the grave had a crude grave marker – a piece of board with the man’s name: Sweeney. Apparently the Japanese had buried him, marked his grave, and kept his dog tags. Why? Our Graves Registration wouldn’t have left him there. Was it an apology? A warning? Or was it the natives? We would never know.
– T. I. Miller K/3/5, Earned In Blood

Articles and Records:


Photo Gallery:
Coming soon.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s