Lawrence C. Taylor


NAME
Lawrence Coburn Taylor
NICKNAME
Red
MCSN
O-7513
HOME OF RECORD
888 Paramount Road, Oakland, CA
NEXT OF KIN
Father, Mrs. Lawrence H. Taylor
DATE OF BIRTH
May 12, 1920
DATE OF ENLISTMENT
January 14, 1941
DATE OF LOSS
August 24, 1942
REGION
Solomons
CAMPAIGN / AREA
Guadalcanal
CASUALTY TYPE
MIA (Declared Dead)
25 August 1943
UNIT
VMF-212
STAD with VMF-223
DUTY
Pilot
F4F-4 #02084
CIRCUMSTANCES OF LOSS
Second Lieutenant Taylor was one of five VMF-212 “Hell Hounds” assigned to temporary aviation duty with the amalgam Cactus Air Force out of Henderson Field, Guadalcanal. On 24 August 1942, every available plane was scrambled to intercept a large Japanese bombing raid, but the engine of Taylor’s Wildcat (BuNo 02084) failed to start. Undaunted, “Red” Taylor repaired the engine and took off alone, catching the tail end of the dogfight.Taylor and 2Lt. Cloyd “Rex” Jeans knocked down one of the bombers, but Taylor was shot down in turn by a Zero from the Japanese fighter escort. His aircraft was last seen falling out of control; no parachutes were observed.

“Red” Taylor was declared dead on 25 August 1943.

INDIVIDUAL DECORATIONS
Silver Star, Purple Heart
LAST KNOWN RANK
Second Lieutenant
STATUS OF REMAINS
Not recovered.
MEMORIALS
Manila American Cemetery

Biography:
Temporarily removed for editing and updating. Contact the webmaster for information on this Marine.


The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Second Lieutenant Lawrence C. Taylor (MCSN: 0-7513), United States Marine Corps Reserve, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity while serving with Marine Fighting Squadron TWO TWENTY-THREE (VMF-223), in action against enemy Japanese forces in the Solomon Islands on 24 August 1942. Prevented by a faulty engine from taking off with his flight to attack a hostile force of greatly superior strength, Second Lieutenant Taylor skillfully effected hasty repairs and at the first opportunity took off alone to join his comrades in the action. Although it was his first combat flight and he was entirely unfamiliar with the area, his superb airmanship and dauntless courage under extremely adverse conditions enabled him to destroy one heavy bomber before his own plane was shot down. Second Lieutenant Taylor’s exemplary conduct and unswerving devotion to duty were an inspiration to the members of his squadron and in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.


Articles and Records:


Photo Gallery:

Red Taylor attended University of California Berkeley from 1939-1941. He dropped out after his junior year to join the Navy.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s