Richard D. Haring

NAME
Richard Donald Haring
NICKNAME
MCSN
O-8634
HOME OF RECORD
1771 Getty Street, Muskegon, MI
NEXT OF KIN
Parents, Harry & Margaret Haring
DATE OF BIRTH
1916
DATE OF ENLISTMENT
May 20, 1941
DATE OF LOSS
September 13, 1942
REGION
Solomons
CAMPAIGN / AREA
Guadalcanal
CASUALTY TYPE
Killed in Action
UNIT
VMF-212
DUTY
Pilot
CIRCUMSTANCES OF LOSS
Second Lieutenant Richard Haring was a pilot assigned to VMF-212, the “Hell Hounds.” On the morning of 13 September 1942, he ferried an F4F-4 Wildcat fighter from a far-off carrier to Henderson Field, Guadalcanal. Just hours after his arrival, the air raid alert sounded, and Haring jumped into the cockpit of one of the waiting fighters.

As the fighters climbed for altitude, Haring’s aircraft was seen to suddenly pitch forward into a dive, then crash full-bore into a hillside some ten miles southwest of Henderson Field. He was killed on impact.

The wreck of Haring’s aircraft was located one week later, and the pilot’s body buried in the field nearby. The location was lost in the years following the war.

INDIVIDUAL DECORATIONS
Distinguished Flying Cross, Purple Heart
LAST KNOWN RANK
Second Lieutenant
STATUS OF REMAINS
Buried in the field, approximately 10 miles SW of Henderson Field, in vicinity of aircraft wreckage.
MEMORIALS
Namesake of Haring Field, Efate
Oakwood Cemetery, Muskegon, MI
Manila American Cemetery

Biography:
Temporarily removed for editing and updating. Contact the webmaster for information on this Marine.


For heroism and extraordinary achievement while attached to a Marine Fighting Squadron in action against enemy Japanese forces on Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands, on September 13, 142. In spite of the fact that he had just completed a long, tiring, and difficult over-water flight, Second Lieutenant HARING after delivering a new fighter plane to Guadalcanal, immediately volunteered to intercept a formation of twenty-eight enemy bombers and twenty fighters. Flying an unassigned combat plane, he took off after the Japanese forces. His fervent desire to engage the enemy and courageous devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

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