Gordon R. McCulloch

NAME
Gordon Roy McCulloch
NICKNAME
MCSN
O-11134
HOME OF RECORD
220 East 20th Street, Okmulgee, OK
NEXT OF KIN
Parents, Roy & Gladys McCulloch
DATE OF BIRTH
July 28, 1917
DATE OF ENLISTMENT
May 11, 1939
DATE OF LOSS
November 10, 1942
REGION
Solomons
CAMPAIGN / AREA
Guadalcanal
CASUALTY TYPE
MIA / Declared Dead
November 11 1943
UNIT
E/2/2nd Marines
DUTY
Weapons Platoon Leader
CIRCUMSTANCES OF LOSS
At 0700 on 10 November 1942, the Second Battalion, 2nd Marines joined in a general advance westward from the Point Cruz area which had been their home for several days. Japanese machine gunners in hidden positions caught the battalion in their sights and, in the words of the battalion report, “Company E and Company G were held up temporarily.” In reality, both companies suffered heavy casualties.

Second Lieutenant Gordon R. McCulloch, the weapons platoon leader, made his way to the front lines to direct mortar fire on the enemy positions and assist the wounded men streaming back to the aid station. When the company reorganized on their objective line, however, McCulloch was not present. He was declared missing in action following the engagement, and presumed dead as of 11 November 1943.

INDIVIDUAL DECORATIONS
Silver Star, Purple Heart
LAST KNOWN RANK
Second Lieutenant
STATUS OF REMAINS
Missing In Action
MEMORIALS
Manila American Cemetery

Biography:
Coming soon. Contact the webmaster for information on this Marine.

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Second Lieutenant Gordon R. McCulloch (MCSN: 0-11134), United States Marine Corps Reserve, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while a member of Company E, Second Battalion, Second Marines, Reinforced, during action against enemy Japanese forces in the Solomon Islands on 10 November 1942. While directing the fire of his mortar section, Second Lieutenant McCulloch exposed himself to heavy machine gun shelling at the front lines. When several of his men were killed or injured during the course of the action, he risked his life in an attempt to rescue them. His courageous initiative and heroic devotion to duty, maintained with utter disregard for his own personal safety, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Articles and Records:
Coming soon.


Photo Gallery:

Gordon McCulloch (circled) on the 1937 Stanford University football team. He attained some minor celebrity as a guard for the team – especially after an automobile accident threatened his football career.

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