Wyvon L. Myrick

NAME
Wyvon Leon Myrick
NICKNAME
Squeaky
SERVICE NUMBER
241115
HOME OF RECORD
1022 North Kedzie Avenue, Chicago, IL
NEXT OF KIN
Wife, Mrs. Catherine Myrick
DATE OF BIRTH
~1911
ENTERED SERVICE
December 28, 1933
DATE OF LOSS
May 6, 1942
REGION
Philippines
CAMPAIGN / AREA
Corregidor / Fort Hughes
CASUALTY TYPE
KIA
UNIT
M/3/4th Marines
DUTY
CIRCUMSTANCES OF LOSS
Platoon Sergeant Wyvon “Squeaky” Myrick was stationed at Fort Hughes (Caballo Island) during the defense of Corregidor.

On 6 May 1942, as their buddies on Corregidor desperately struggled against an amphibious invasion force, the Fort Hughes garrison withstood a pasting from Japanese artillery and aircraft. During one such bombardment, Myrick took cover in a gun emplacement, just as a shell scored a direct hit.

Myrick’s body was seen and identified by at least one other Marine, but it is not known where he was buried. His remains have never been recovered or identified.

INDIVIDUAL DECORATIONS
Purple Heart
LAST KNOWN RANK
Platoon Sergeant
STATUS OF REMAINS
Not Recovered.
MEMORIALS
Manila American Cemetery

Biography:
Temporarily removed for editing and updating. Contact the webmaster for information on this Marine.

 

Waves of planes hit the island in a continuous air bombardment. Mac decided he needed a safer refuge and ran for a small foxhole. When he jumped in he almost landed on Squeaky Myrick, and the two friends sat with heads down and tried to talk of better times while the bombs and artillery shells dropped around them…. [A] bomb hit nearby. “Mac, it’s gettin’ too hot in here for me,” [Myrick] yelled, “let’s get the hell outta here!”
“Dammit!” Mac yelled, “I’m not about to stick my head out of this hole!”
With shells falling all around them, Squeaky panicked. Mac watched, dumbfounded, as Squeaky jumped out of the gun emplacement and ran toward one of the bigger emplacements about 15 yards away. It happened in a split second. Squeaky jumped in just as a shell hit the emplacement dead center. Mac watched in horror as Squeaky and the others in the shelter were blown to bits. With body parts scattered over the area, Mac buried his head and cried remembering Squeaky Myrick: a likable guy, a good sergeant, and a man who loved dancing, basketball, and the Corps.
– Bob Wilbanks, Last Man Out: Glenn McDole, Survivor of the Palawan Massacre in WWII.

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