Jack Miller

NAME
Jack Miller
NICKNAME
SERVICE NUMBER
O-8438
HOME OF RECORD
2714 South Boulevard, Dallas, TX
NEXT OF KIN
Father, Mr. Henry S. Miller
DATE OF BIRTH
April 2, 1920
ENTERED SERVICE
May 19, 1941
DATE OF LOSS
December 3, 1942
REGION
Solomons
CAMPAIGN / AREA
Guadalcanal
CASUALTY TYPE
Killed In Action
UNIT
2nd Raiders (Co. A)
DUTY
Platoon Leader
CIRCUMSTANCES OF LOSS
First Lieutenant Jack Miller was a platoon leader in Company A, Second Raider Battalion. He participated in the “Long Patrol” on Guadalcanal from 25 November to 3 December 1942.

On 3 December, Miller’s company scaled to the top of Mount Mombula (or Mount Austen) and discovered a network of Japanese fortifications. While leading his platoon through a thickly wooded draw, Miller was shot in the chest and face by a Japanese soldier.

The following day, as his men rushed to bring their wounded to the safety of Henderson Field, Jack Miller died of his wounds. He was buried beside the trail leading down the mountain, but the location was subsequently lost; his remains, if recovered, have not been identified.

INDIVIDUAL DECORATIONS
Navy Cross, Purple Heart
LAST KNOWN RANK
First Lieutenant
STATUS OF REMAINS
Buried in the field.
MEMORIALS
USS Jack Miller (DE-410)
Manila American Cemetery

Biography:
Coming soon. Contact the webmaster for information on this Marine.

The President of the United States of America takes pride in presenting the Navy Cross (Posthumously) to First Lieutenant Jack Miller (MCSN: 0-8438), United States Marine Corps Reserve, for extraordinary heroism and distinguished service while serving as a Platoon Leader in Company A, SECOND Marine Raider Battalion in combat against enemy Japanese forces at Mambula, Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands, on 3 December 1942. As Commanding Officer of a platoon of Company A which had the point, First Lieutenant Miller daringly led a flank attack on a strong enemy combat patrol engaged by his battalion at the summit of the hill. Realizing the advance of his platoon was being held up by hostile machine-gun fire, he dauntlessly led the assault on the Japanese gun position, sustaining wounds from which he died the following day. His great courage, outstanding leadership, and fearless devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave up his life in the defense of his country.

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